Fleece Pig Slippers

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

I have an abundance of leftover pink fleece from Sis’s Halloween costume. She was a pig – the costume was ridic cute, but I didn’t post it. You will have to wait until next year. Bad blogger, I know. Anyway, I made that doll diaper changing table pad with the pink fleece which got rid of a big chunk of the fabric a few weeks ago. Sis has been wanting some slippers for a while now, so I made her these fleece pig slippers. This method of making slippers can also be used to make plain fleece socks as well as rain boot liners.

Materials

  • Pink Fleece – yardage depends on the size of the feet but 1/2 yard should be plenty.
  • Pen
  • Brown/white fabric – you need such a tiny amount that you should just by an 8×11 sheet of felt. Better yet, take a mismatched sock or old t-shirt and cut it up. I would scour the house before I bought this fabric.
  • Scissors
  • Thread
  • Sewing machine
  • Hot glue gun/glue
  • Elastic – The length depends on who this is for. My tiny 5 year old needed about 7 inches which allowed for plenty of room to knot it off.
  • Safety pin

How To

1. Pull on your fleece and stretch it. Now rotate the fleece 90 degrees and stretch it again. One way should have had more stretch than the other. You want your slipper to be constructed so that the way with more give runs horizontally across the foot.

2. Hold the fabric up to the front your subject’s foot and leg with the stretch running horizontally and the wrong side facing out. With your pen, draw a straight(ish) line on either side of the leg from where you want the slipper to hit at the top down to the ground.

3. Draw a line around the toe of the fabric, connecting the points where the two vertical lines hit the ground. This is the front portion of your slipper.

4. Cut out the shape you just drew, adding an extra 1/2 inch around for seam allowance.

5. Hold the fabric up against the back of the same leg, wrong side out. Draw a vertical line down the sides of the leg at the same point as the front.

6. Draw a line around the heel, connecting the points where the two vertical lines hit. This is the rear portion of the slipper. Cut out this shape, with the 1/2 inch seam allowance.

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

7. Trace the bottom of the foot on felt. I put dots directly around the foot so I knew the true size and then drew a line out from there where I wanted the seam to be. I cut the foot out 1/2 inch from that line.

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

8. Center the toe of the bottom of the foot to the toe of the top part of the slipper, right sides together. Pin the foot to the top fabric along the edge. You will basically be pinning from the center of the arch all the way around the toe to the outside of the foot.

9. Sew the pieces together, leaving about 1/2 at each end free.

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

10. Center the back of the heel of the foot on the center of the back piece, right sides together. Pin together and stitch the same way you did the front. When you are done, the entire bottom of the foot should be stitched to the front/back pieces.

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

11. Pin the sides of the slipper together and stitch from the foot bed up to the top, leaving about a 1 inch portion unsewn at the top.

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

12. Trim any major seam allowance excess off.

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

13. Flip the slipper right side out.

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

14. With scraps of pink and white and black fabric, cut out two ears, two eyes, two pupils, one nose, two nostrils, and one tail.

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

15. Hot glue the facial features onto the toe area of the slipper. Glue the tail to the back.

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

16. Fold the top of the slipper inwards and stitch almost the entire thing closed.

17. Attach the safety pin to one end of your elastic and thread it through the top hem.

18. Knot off the elastic and trim the ends.

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

19. Sew the remainder of the hem closed.

20. If these are going to be slippers – not socks or boot liners – add some traction to the bottom. Dot blobs of hot glue on the bottom of each slipper and let it cool. These will keep your kids from breaking their faces open as they run around that one wicked bend in your house that always lines up with the corner of a coffee table.

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

21. Repeat this whole schebang with the other foot.

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

Fleece Pig Slippers from www.nearlycrafty.com

Near Misses

  • I made these without the elastic, but Sis wanted it to be more snug so I added the elastic. If you don’t want it, totally skip those steps.
  • If you want these to be boot liners, you will need to make sure the top is tall enough so that it can be folded down on top of the boot. You will also want to make sure you sew these so the right side of the fabric ends up inside the boot.
  • If you want these to be socks, make them a little closer to actual foot size.

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